2016/04/01

Sis. Anger

This page is under construction. Translation may be changed.
Released on 2016 Apr. 1st, included in "METAL RESISTANCE"
Lyric: TSUBOMETAL, TMETAL / Music: TSUBOMETAL / Arr.: YUPPEMETAL

This song is sung by MOAMETAL & YUIMETAL.

Sis. Anger

I dislike
guys who think only about themselves.
You're uncool, super uncool.
Don't approach me!

I dislike
"impossible", "useless", "it's reached the limit".
They're uncool, super uncool.
I don't wanna hear them.

I will knock your ill-nature into shape.
Burn! Burn your anger hidden inside!

"Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
It doesn't matter to win or lose.
"Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
It is only to be serious or not that matters.

I dislike! dislike! dislike! dislike!
Fighting spirit! spirit! spirit! spirit!
You, stupid guy!

I dislike
guys who are not serious but only make excuses.
Stop kidding! I got super irritated.
Don't turn your dirty face to me!

I dislike
guys who can't do it but pretend to be tough.
Stop kidding! I got really irritated.
Get out of my sight!

I will knock your ill-nature into shape.
I will burn up everything with flare of anger.

"Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
It doesn't matter to be skillful or awkward.
"Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
You may think back but may not regret.

Fight! Fight against sneaking temptation!
Fight! Fight! Shout out your anger!

"Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
You say sorry? You say forgive me? What do I do with you?
"Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
It's a lie? Flattery? Ready for anything! Bring it on!



  ROMAJI LYRIC AND NOTES ARE BELOW.


[i] About Japanese Abusive Words

As noted below, the original lyric contains many vulgar words, but most of them are lazy or rough pronunciations which are usually regarded as rude (note #4, #6, #9; revised on 2016 May 9, thanks to Anonymous sans on 2016 May 1&7) or somewhat rude synonyms (like "guy"? note #3, #10, #11, #18) or purely provoking words without dirty nuances (note #13, #23, #24). Only "baka yarô" (note #15, #16) are special words to insult someone.

There are dirty Japanese words to insult someone such as "k_s_" which corresponds to "sh_t" and an Osaka dialect "itemau" which corresponds to "f__k (you)", but such Japanese words are not used in this song, so I don't use such English words. I think dirty words should be reserved for dirty words.

"Zakkenja nê" is a strong expression, but it is just a variant pronunciation of "fuzakeru no de wa nai", so I have no idea but translating it to "stop kidding" (I'm sorry for not knowing English well). Probably Tokyo dialect is poor in abusive vocabulary (so the typical gangsters in TV often speak Osaka dialect). Writing for their honor, Osaka dialect has richer vocabulary in general.

Some fans wonder why (Amuse let) BABYMETAL sing these somewhat offensive lyrics, and some fans seem to dislike such lyrics. But this song is fictional. The lyrics are not what they really want to say. And I think the words are somewhat deliberately selected just as a criminal heroine in a Japanese movie is usually depicted so as not to lose our sympathy.

[ii] Does she want to refuse or improve these guys?

This song has some lines that say as if she refuses these guys, which I mark with (ii) below. Some other lines say as if she wants to improve these guys, which I mark with [ii], and some lines sound like the words of rock & roll preachers or something, which I mark with {ii}.

If one tries to improve those whom one dislikes, there should be some reason why one doesn't simply try to drive them away. Of course, one doesn't necessarily have goodwill towards them though improving them. A wise dictator knows brainwashing is more profitable to him than bloody purge. If "Sis." (= sister) of the title means that a girl dislikes her brother(s), she can't easily desert him/them even though she dislike him/them very much.

I pay attention to the line "I will beat your ill-nature into shape". Some teachers or something do this mainly for their self-realization (i.e. the guys are mere materials for their work), but I don't think this song is sung by such a kind of person, so I incline to think she wants to rescue the guys from such a state of being ill-nature because she has some goodwill towards them though she uses harsh words. (Unnecessary addition: I want to call this 'goodwill with harsh words' "ツンデレ" (tsundere), but it seems to be confusing because the word originally refers to a girl who is usually unfriendly (= tsun) but gets over-friendly (= dere) to her lover once she's fallen in love.)

In some interviews, Miss Moa said like "I hope 'Sis. Anger' would encourage many people." and Miss Yui said like "This song made me stand up straight when I sang it, so I hope it can motivate the listeners even a little".


Sis. Anger

 
Romaji LyricEnglish TranslationNotes
 1
Kirai daa, I dislike2
jibun no koto shika kangae-nai yatsu. guys who think only about themselves.3
Kakko warii choo kakko warii kara You're uncool, super uncool.4,5
chikazuite kunna! Don't approach me!6,(ii)
 
Kirai daa, I dislike
muri toka muda toka genkai desu toka. "impossible", "useless", "it's reached the limit".7,8
kakko warii choo kakko warii kara They're uncool, super uncool.
kiki-taku nee. I don't wanna hear them.9
 
Omae no sono konjoo tataki-naosu zo. I will beat your ill-nature into shape.10,11,[ii]
Moyase yo, moyase yo,
    mune no naka ni himeta ikari o!
Burn! Burn your anger hidden inside![ii]
 
"Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!" "Stop kidding! Hey, you!"12,13
Katta ka maketa ka kankee nee. It doesn't matter to win or lose.{ii}
"Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!" "Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
Daiji na koto wa honki ka doo ka dakee. It is only to be serious or not that matters.{ii}
 
Kirai da! Kirai da! Kirai da! Kirai da! I dislike! dislike! dislike! dislike!2
Kiai da! Kiai da! Kiai da! Kiai da! Fighting spirit! spirit! spirit! spirit!14
Baka yaroo! You, stupid guy!15,16
 
Kirai daa, I dislike
honki ja nee noni iiwake bakkari. guys who are not serious but only make excuses.17
Fuzakenna! Choo iraira suru kara Stop kidding! I got super irritated.6
sono tsura mukenna! Don't turn your dirty face to me!6,18,(ii)
 
Kirai daa, I dislike
deki mo shi-nee noni tsuyogatteru yatsu. guys who can't do it but pretend to be tough.
Fuzakenna! Maji iraira suru kara Stop kidding! I got really irritated.
kiete kuree! Get out of my sight!19,(ii)
 
Omae no sono konjoo tataki-naosu zo. I will beat your ill-nature into shape.
Ikari no honoo de
    subete yaki-tsukushite yaru kara.
I will burn up everything with flare of anger.
 
"Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!" "Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
Umai ka heta ka wa kankee nee. It doesn't matter to be skillful or awkward.{ii}
"Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!" "Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
Hansei shite mo ii kookai shite wa damee. You may think back but may not regret.{ii}
 
Tatakae! Tatakae! Shinobi-yoru yuuwaku to! Fight! Fight against sneaking temptation!20,[ii]
Tatakae! Tatakae! Omaera no ikari o sakebe yo! Fight! Fight! Shout out your anger!10,[ii]
 
"Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!" "Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
Gomen ne?  Yurushite?
    Doo shiyoo ka naa?
You say sorry?  You say forgive me?
    What do I do with you?
21
"Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!" "Stop kidding! Hey, you!"
Uso desu?  Gomasuri?
    Jootoo daa!  Kakatte koi yaa!
It's a lie?  Flattery?
    Ready for anything!  Bring it on!
21,22,
23,24
 

Notes

  1. There are the words spoken in male voice at the beginning. Some reddit users have found they are from Christians' "Book of Revelation" (= "Apocalypse"), chapt. 6.: "I watched as the Lamb opened the first of the seven seals. Then I heard one of the four living creatures say in a voice like thunder, 'Come!'". I don't know what these words mean to this song.
  2. "Kirai" (= dislike) is neutral as to hatred. It is never used for those who killed one's family, etc. In such cases, "nikumu" (verb) or "nikui" (adj.) is used.
  3. "Yatsu" (= manservant?) is a rude word used for a man. It is also used for a thing (e.g. "Akai yatsu o kure!" = Pass me red one!) and sometimes used to express intimacy (e.g. "Ii yatsu da." = You're/he's a good guy). "Gaki" (= starving ogre (Buddhism term) ) is used to abuse a kid, and "ama" (= nun (of Buddhism) ) for a woman, but "ama" isn't so popular because many people use "yatsu" also for a woman.
  4. "Kakko warî" is literally "the form/appearance is bad". The antonym is "kakko ii". "Warî" (warii) is a rude pronunciation of "warui" (= bad).
  5. "Chô" (choo) originally means "super" of "super-sonic", etc. but young people use it also as "very".
  6. "Kunna", "fuzakenna", "mukenna" are rude contractions of "kuru na", "fuzakeru na", "mukeru na". They are the negative imperative forms (= Don't ---).
  7. "Muri" means "unreasonable" (originally) or "difficult/impossible". When "muri" is used as refusal, I'm not sure of the proportion of unwillingness and objective/subjective difficulty in the reason.
  8. "Genkai desu." is literally "It is the limit.", and in this context, it means "I can't do anymore".
  9. "Nê" (nee) is a rude pronunciation of "nai". It means "not" and is analyzed as an adjective or an auxiliary verb.
  10. "Omae" is a rude word for "you", but it was originally an honorific word and still sometimes used to express intimacy.
        Both singular "omae" & plural "omaera" are used, but I'm not so sure whether it is for distinguishing the plurality of "you" or just for matching the number of syllables to the rhythm.
  11. "Konjô" means nature or disposition of a person. It is mainly used for bad one but also used for good one (e.g. "konjô ga aru" = having guts or being patient).
  12. "Zakkenja nê zo!" (= Stop kidding!) is a rude contraction of "fuzakeru no de wa nai zo" ("ja" = "de wa"). Japanese accent is pitch accent, and "fuzakeru" is pronounced "fu_za-ke-ru_" (-:hi, _:low) in Tokyo accent. The initial low syllable is sometimes dropped and the word becomes "zakeru", then the accent is changed to "za_ke-ru_" according to the general rule of Tokyo accent. "Zakkeru" has a short silence before "k" (called "sokuon"). I guess it is inserted to stress the initial low syllable.
        Only this line (appearing four times) is enclosed in quotation marks, but I don't know why.
  13. "Oi" is a rude interjection to draw attention. "Ora" is a rude interjection to provoke or agitate someone.
  14. "Kiai" means (fighting) spirit or something. There is a retired pro wrestler, Animal HAMAGUCHI, who shouted "Kiai da!" to charge himself with fighting spirit. I'm not sure whether she charges the guys with it or she means it is a matter of fighting spirit whether things are impossible or not.
  15. "Baka" means a fool but is also used non-abusively. For example, finding a friend's bad choice, some Japanese say "Baka da na. --- sureba yokatta noni." (= You're foolish. You should have done ---). In many cases, however, they're not looking down on their friend but just frankly expressing their surprise like "wow" (some people don't like this saying, though). And when a girl says "Baka, baka, baka!" to her (expected) boyfriend, it sometimes means "Why can't you understand how much I like/love you?"
  16. "Yarô" originally means a young man. Now it is mainly used to abuse a man, but there is also non-abusive use such as "Torakku Yarô" (movie title) which refers to independent truck drivers.
  17. "Bakkari" (= only) is an emphasizing pronunciation of "bakari".
  18. "Tsura" means a face. Now it sounds rude (except used in some compound words) but has no nuance of "dirty".
  19. "Kiete kure!" (= Disappear!) is rude but a request because "kure" is the non-polite form of "kudasai" and means "give me/us". The simple imperative is "Kiero!" and there is the emphasized phrase "Kie usero!" ("usero" too means "disappear") which too has 5 morae and is replaceable here.
  20. At first, I thought "shinobi-yoru yuuwaku" (= sneaking temptation) probably means that there are both some (other) undesirable state (which is not yet realized) and some tendency towards it and they are difficult to notice, but that undesirable state may simply be that the guys would no longer feel anger.
  21. "Gomen ne?", "Yurushite?", "Uso desu?" & "Gomasuri?" are guys' apologies, etc. with question marks. They mean "You say [ --- ] ?"
  22. At first, I thought "uso desu" (= it's a lie) is an excuse negating guys' words that offended her, but it seems to negate preceding "sorry" & "forgive me", so she gets angry again and shouts "Bring it on!".
        (Unnecessary addition:) It sounds, however, unnatural to me because, if one negates one's apology voluntarily & immediately, it is likely that one had some bad intent and say more maliciously like "うっそだよーん" (usso da yôn) than "uso desu". However, afterwards when one is asked "Why did you say so then?", one may answer honestly "It was a lie, just flattery."
  23. "Jôtô" means a high class/quality. It sometimes means satisfaction or welcome, and sometimes ironically (e.g. "0 ten? Jôtô da!" = Rated 0/10? It's welcome!). Here, however, I don't translate it to "welcome" because it is hardly ironic to welcome flattery.
  24. "Kakatte koi ya" is the imperative "come to attack me". "Ya" is an emphasizing particle used in Osaka, etc. ("yo" in Tokyo, etc). Probably the lyric writers chose "ya(a)" because Osaka dialect sounds strong.
        (Unnecessary addition:) However, what makes it sounds strong is its accent (ka-kat-te-ko-i_ya_; -:high, _:low), but actually they shout it in Tokyo accent (ka_kat-te_ko-i_ya_) and it is difficult to stress the initial low syllable, so it doesn't sound so strong as native Osaka shouts.

79 comments :

  1. Am I the only one who feels a strong vibe of Kirino from "Oreimo" in this song? It only lacks some "Hentai! Siskon! Rorikon!" shouts in it to be 100% hit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, not the only one, but i think it's more like "Magisuka Gakuin".

      Delete
  2. why is this fandom so fast.. the album was only released today and we already have the lyrics. still an amazing album though!

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  3. "The original lyrics are rather vulgar, but I don't know English slang well.
    "
    Maybe I can help you make this lyrics more vulgar?

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for a kind offer, but I'm sorry I think the situation is complicated.

      Firstly, even the native speakers often misunderstand the meaning of the word. I think only the teenage girl that is a native dweller&speaker of Tokyo&London could translate these properly.

      Secondly, I'm not sure whether my translation could conveyed it or not, but these lyrics can be interpreted like this: it is kind advice but she is so shy that she can't say straight and uses such vulgar words. Such a girl is sometimes called "tsundere", but there is also a possibility that she really dislikes the guys and she is only so talkative that she says something to be interpreted as advice.

      I think it is very hard to bring properly such information only by the translated sentences, so I prefer rather literal translation with lengthy explanation.

      Delete
    2. Oh, ok, I get it.
      And I want suggest you change "dislike" with "hate". I think it would be more appropriate in this case:)

      Delete
    3. Thank you for suggestion.
      The word "kirai" is neutral for hatred. When a Japanese young girl says "Dai kirai!" (= I dislike you very much), she sometimes means "Why do you do such a thing not understanding how much I like you?".
      Anyway, I will rethink these new translations soon.

      Delete
    4. Note for "ツンデレ" (tsundere):
      This word originally means a game/manga/anime character who is usually unfriendly (= tsun) but becomes overfriendly (= dere) if getting closer. Here I use it in another meaning: those who are unfriendly (= tsun) but give something helpful (= dere). This usage (not my original) is a bit confusing because the something helpful doesn't always imply giver's favor.

      Delete
    5. Wow, I thought I knew what tsundere is. Thank you for expansion of my knowledge.
      Can you explain how did you understand, that this song all about tsundere in the first place, please?

      Delete
    6. GJ! Mr. Du Enki!
      I'm Japanese and feel something of different sense from this translation. I don't think this lyric is a kind of "tsundere"
      because the sentence "Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!" give very strong meanings such as intimidation or absolute rejection toward mental or physical pressure. In general, we never use the word for our friends or family.
      The sentence is used repeatedly in the lyric, so this sentence makes the entire atmosphere of the lyric serious. However, the gap between YUI-MOA and the serious feeling makes a kind of funny sense to me.
      Just for reference. Thank you.

      Delete
    7. To стр. 119 san:
      I can't easily conclude whether she is tsundere in some meaning or not, because it is hard to understand her state of mind ("Sis." may mean she is his/their sister). Since she says "I will knock/beat your ill-nature into shape", she has the will to improve the guy(s) though she says she dislikes him/them.

      I have a magazine (Hedoban vol.10) which contains BABYMETAL's long interviews. It may contain some hints for interpretation, but I haven't read it yet.

      Delete
    8. To TAT san:
      Thank you for comment.
      In my experience, those who refused me never told me the reason. Some boys just got out of the room and some girls just started ignoring me. Therefore this song doesn't seem to me girls' simple rejection of such guys.

      ---- unnecessary addition ----
      In my jr. & sr. highschool days, some rude boys said something like "Zakkenna", but it was always just a bluff and I didn't get scared by it. However, when I mistook some mischief as done by such a rude classmate, he said like "You think so without evidence only because I'm a rude boy". He said this quietly maybe because he got deeply disappointed rather than angry. Anyway, I got very scared & sorry and immediately apologized him. If I had replied thoughtlessly then, his anger must have exploded with this word. I don't know whether, then, we could have got to such an happy end shown in good old school dramas.

      Delete
    9. I agree with you. Thank you for your analogy.
      OK, I think again.
      "Huzakenna" < "Zakkenna" < "Zakkenja nee" < "Zakenja nee zo, oi! ora! "
      The term "oi! ora!" is not used when we'd like to improve someone in general. I imagine such situation that she definitely kick someone in the ass.(How violent she is!)
      This situation is quite special: she is seriously mad and dislike him but she cannot abandon him. I assume she is an elder sister and mad because her younger brother is rude and loose.
      "Tsundere" is usually used to describe the relationship between friends.

      Anyway, "stop kidding" is not such strong. Non-native listners may be misled by this translation. (for example, the first comment "oreimo" what???)


      Thanks

      Delete
    10. I will try to find a better translation, but, no matter how vulgarly she says, what she says means just "stop kidding". Though there are Japanese words corresponding to "f__k", "s__t", etc, they are not used here, so I don't want to use such slang just only because English speakers often say it in such a situation.

      Delete
    11. Well, I think I somewhat get it. Thank you for all yours efforts again!
      It will be really awesome if you'd translate that interview as well.

      Delete
    12. I think in English it would be "stop messing around" or more strongly "stop f**king around" Messing around means wasting your time or doing something that has no purpose. http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/mess+around

      Delete
    13. Also when you say "I'm messing around" it just has the meaning I said. However when you tell someone "Stop messing around" if usually implies the you think the person is not taking something seriously that they should be.

      Delete
  4. I always thought that "baka yarô" literally means "stupid bastard" or a little more loosely "asshole".

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for comment.
      The nuances of many Japanese words change a lot with the intonation, so it is difficult to translate. "Baka yarô" literally means "stupid guy". Takeshi KITANO often says this on TV but it is never censored, while "kusottare" (lit. one who shits) is probably censored.

      Delete
  5. 翻訳お疲れ様です。
    解釈は人それぞれだと思いますが僕個人としてはこの歌にはDu Enkiさんの言う「ツンデレ」的要素はまったく感じられません。
    コバメタルが「BABYMETAL流のデスメタルを作ろうとした」のような発言をされていたと思いますが、Sis.Angerはまさに歌詞そのまんま「気の強い女の子が(情けない)男を存分に罵る」曲と解釈するのが正しいと思います。(そして罵られた側の男は、ある者は気合いを入れられて奮起し、ある者はマゾヒスティックな歓びに身もだえする…この場合、女王様がツンデレでは台無しですw)

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for comment.
      My usage seems to confuse many fans, but with "tsundere", I wanted to mean "severe" words containing "kind" advice. You say "she says abuse", but the lyrics have many positive elements, so they seem to me "scolding and encouraging". I can't think they are pure black lyrics as you say. I don't know whether it is because Miss Moa & Miss Yui requested such positive elements or simply because the lyric writer failed to be pure black.

      コメントありがとうございます。
      私の言い方が誤解を招くようですが、「ツンデレ」で、厳しい言葉が親切な忠告を含んでいることを言いたかったのです。「罵る」とおっしゃいますが、歌詞には前向きな要素が多く有るので、私には「叱咤激励」に思えます。あなたのおっしゃるような真っ黒な歌詞だとは思えません。最愛ちゃん由結ちゃんがそういう前向きな要素を要求したからなのか、作詞家が真っ黒になれなかっただけなのかは知りませんけど。

      Delete
  6. コメントありがとうございます。
    私は「真っ黒」とは一言も言っておりませんよ?
    歌詞の内容とは正確に符号してはいませんが、私の中でこの曲は「電車で痴漢をしてる男に空手チョップを食らわせ『かっこわりーことしてんじゃねえ!』と啖呵を切る、口は悪いが正義漢のカッコイイ女の子」というイメージです。「親切な忠告」などする気はさらさらなく、単純に「情けない男を見ると腹が立ってしょうがない」人物です。


    問題だと思うのは、作者の意図を勝手に斟酌して詩のニュアンスを改変されているような気がする点です。
    元の歌詞が「わざと」汚い言葉を使っているのだから、その通りに訳すべきであって、「これは実はツンデレだから」とニュートラルな言葉に翻訳してしまうのは翻訳者の僭越という気がしまし、むしろ英語圏の人には曲のニュアンスがまったく伝わらないのではないでしょうか。Du Enkiさんの解釈はあくまで注釈・メモとして付記されるべきでしょう。

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    Replies
    1. I'm sorry, but I can't imagine her state of mind if she has no intention to advise but says "It is only to be serious or not that matters" or "You may think back but may not regret".

      I have no intention to change the nuance of this song. I have written "the original lyrics are rather vulgar". I just had no time to choose suitable slang because I thought I had to translate as many songs as possible before the Wembley concerts.

      Anyway, for example, "tsura" is mainly used in abuse but itself is a neutral word meaning "face". I have never dropped any dirty Japanese adjectives in translation. The reason why I don't add dirty English words is just that Japanese also has the words that seem to be counterparts of them but they are not used here. I think a good translation should be not from Japanese popular abusing words to English popular abusing words but what makes English listeners feel both vulgarness and difference between English ones and Japanese ones.


      お言葉ですが、忠告する気が無いのに「大事なことは本気かどうかだけぇ」とか「反省してもいい後悔してはダメー」と言う心境は、想像できません。

      この歌のニュアンスを変える意図は全く有りません。「元歌詞はかなり下品だ」と書きました。ただ、ウェンブリ公演までになるべく多くの曲を翻訳しなくてはいけないと思い、適切なスラングを選ぶ時間が無かっただけです。

      いずれにせよ、例えば「ツラ」は主に罵る時に使われますが、それ自体は「顔」を意味する中立的な語です。私は、翻訳において、日本語の汚い形容詞を一つも無視していません。私が汚い英語を追加しない理由は、ただ、日本語にもそれに対応すると思われる言葉が有るのに、それらが使われていないからです。良い翻訳とは、日本語の一般的な罵り言葉を英語の一般的な罵り言葉に移すことではなく、
      英語聴者に下品さと同時に日本語と英語の罵り言葉の違いの両方を感じさせるものであるべきだと、思います。

      Delete
    2. My explanation is inaccurate.
      The counterpart of "f__k you" is "いてまう" (itemau) which is not a standard Japanese but an Osaka dialect. Tokyo dialect is poor in abusing words, so gangsters often use Osaka dialect. Anyway, translating less vulgar Japanese words to "f__k you" implies Osaka people speak much dirtier words than New Yorkers, but I don't think it is the case.

      私の説明は不正確でした。
      "F__k you" にぴったりなのは、標準語ではなくて大阪弁の「いてまう」です。東京弁は罵り言葉に乏しいので、ヤクザはよく大阪弁を喋ります。ともかく、それより下品でない日本語を "f__k you" に翻訳してしまうと、大阪人はニューヨーク人よりももっと汚い言葉を使っていることになってしまいますが、私はそうは思いません。

      Delete
    3. はじめまして。横から失礼します。私個人としては、Du Enkiさんの意見が参考になりました。ありがとうございます。

      Delete
    4. Anonymous san, thank you for a favorable comment.
      Anonymousさん、好意的なコメントありがとうございます。

      Delete
  7. コメントは日本語で大丈夫でしょうか?

    私もこの歌詞からツンデレ要素は全く感じません。なぜなら、ツンデレは女の子が恋人または恋心を寄せるたった一人の男の子に対してだけに向けられる態度だからです。

    Du Enkiさんが 「 I dislike guys who~」と翻訳してる通り、この曲の歌詞は不特定多数の人へ向けられたものです。さらに言えば、性別も年齢層も特定できる言葉は出てきません。

    つまり、この曲を聴いた全ての人に「~のような人達は嫌いだ」、「私達がそんな人達の根性を叩き直す」と言っています。

    「大事なことは本気かどうかだけぇ」や「反省してもいい後悔してはダメー」も、同様に
    この曲を聴いた全ての人に向けられています。


    Du Enkiさんの「忠告する気が無いのに "大事なことは本気かどうかだけぇ" とか "反省してもいい後悔してはダメー" と言う心境は、想像できません」に対する一つの回答として、

    「~のような人達は嫌いだ」、「私達がそんな人達の根性を叩き直す」(←見捨てるとは言ってないので救いはある)
          ↓
    (呼び掛け:この曲を聴いてるみんなぁ)"大事なことは本気かどうかだけだよ" "反省してもいい、後悔してはダメだよ"

    と考えれば想像しやすいのではないでしょうか?


    最後に一つだけ。歌詞は少し男っぽい言葉ではありますが、BLACK BABYMETALのファンの皆さんが幻滅するような下品・汚い言葉という感じではないと思いますよ。ちょっと気の強い女の子なら普通に使ってるようなレベルです。まさに「おねだり大作戦」から2年分の小生意気さが加わったような感じの言葉です。



    日本語は翻訳するには難しい言語の内の一つだと思いますが、Du Enkiさんこれからも頑張って下さい。


    by The One of Japanese

    ♪♪ CU (See You) ♪♪

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    1. Thank you for comment.
      I'm sorry for using "tsundere" not in the original meaning but in loose meaning. I mean these are harsh words (= tsun) but kind advice (= dere).
      I think she doesn't want to exterminate such state of being because she dislikes it but rather she wants to improve these guys because she likes them. If this song is addressed to the public as you say, I dare say she loves everyone.
      In some interview, Miss Moa said she hopes "Sis. Anger" would encourage many people.

      コメントありがとうございます。
      「ツンデレ」を本来の意味ではなく不正確な意味で使って済みません。厳しい言葉だが親切な忠告だという意味です。
      彼女はこういう在り方が嫌いだからそれを根絶したいのではなく、むしろ、彼等を好きだから彼等を改善したいのだと、私は考えます。おっしゃるようにこの歌が不特定多数に向けられたのであれば、彼女は皆を愛しているということです。
      インタビューで最愛ちゃんは、この歌で「たくさんの方に勇気を付けられたらいいな」と言いました。

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    2. 私も最初は、「スケ番」のイメージを感じて、とうとうダークサイドに行ったかと心配しました。でも歌詞を良く読むと、並々ならぬ正義感と信念を持った「おっかないアネゴ」の歌だと理解しました。
      愛するが故に罵倒する言葉。この歌詞からは、例えば北斗晶が後輩の女子レスラー達を激励する姿が連想できますね。

      追伸:notes2 にミス "mikumu" (verb) →  "nikumu" (verb)

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    3. Jitensha san, thank you for correcting. I've fixed it.
      自転車さん、指摘有難うございます。修正しました。

      Delete
  8. For note one and the meaning of the words from the book of revelations. I take it to be almost a sort of introduction of what to expect in the song.

    "I watched as the Lamb opened the first of the seven seals."

    We are the lambs opening the seal to hear the song.

    "Then I heard one of the four living creatures say in a voice like thunder"

    BLACK BABYMETAL are the voice, and they are about to speak to us in a voice like thunder.

    Of course this is just my interpretation of it, and I could be completely wrong. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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  9. kiete kuree!
    Get out of my shight!

    "Sight"

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    1. Thank you for correcting. I've fixed it.

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  10. As always, I admire and appreciate your hard work and thoughtful comments.

    It's interesting that you comment that certain words are 'rude' (e.g. "yatsu") or have a rude pronunciation ("wari"). In English, I don't think we have anything like a 'rude' pronunciation. 'Rude' is about being intentionally disrespectful: calling someone names ("stupid"), using crude language ("motherf*cker"), or treating them badly and humiliating them (ignoring them, laughing at them).

    I assume that this sort of Japanese word or pronunciation is more than just very informal, but is still not as rude as words that translate to "sh*t" or "f*ck."

    So I suspect that Japanese has a whole different meaning for 'rude' that English doesn't have, and if you pronounce a word wrong you could offend someone without meaning to. (As opposed to using the wrong word by accident, for example calling someone "a clown" when you mean to say "a joker.")

    So much we need to be able to understand, to translate one song!

    Thank you again!

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    1. Thank you for comment.
      In the movies, I hear some Edokko (counterparts of Cockneys) usually use these pronunciations. If the listener knows the speaker is such a kind of person and the speaker speaks somewhat tenderly, these pronunciations don't offend the listener, so it may be better to call them "loose" or "rough" instead of "rude".

      But, like this song, if those who don't usually use them dare to use them, they intend to be more offensive.

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  11. If free to comment an additional possible interpretation (Is she refusing them? Is she trying to improve them?), the whole "beat your ill-nature into shape" to me reflects the emotion a girl may feel when a guy is treating her lightly or disrespectfully. She's refusing him, but at the same time projecting a "How dare you act that way? I'll show you that you can't do that." It's kind of how I react when a guy I barely know flirts with me with fake confidence and he's treating me as a mild-mannered female he expects to agree to go out with him just because I'm not dating anyone. You know, having the angry reaction of wanting to "teach someone a lesson," when they seem to belittle you.

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    1. Thank you for an interesting interpretation.
      If some guy treats Miss Yui or Miss Moa that way, many fukei such as Mr. OHMURA or Mr. MINEWAKI will knock him down. Anyway, someone keeps BABYMETAL away from love songs, so I think the lyric writers probably don't think about such a dark side of romance(?).

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  12. (Following somehow Thrawn's thread above...)

    [quote from NOTE 1]There are the words spoken in male voice at the beginning. Some reddit users have found they are from Christians' "Book of Revelation" (= "Apocalypse"), chapt. 6.: "I watched as the Lamb opened the first of the seven seals. Then I heard one of the four living creatures say in a voice like thunder, 'Come!'". I don't know what these words mean to this song.[/quote]

    Well in Revelations/Apocalypse these words mark the beginning of the presentation of the Four Horsemen who bring havoc and destruction. There you have it, I guess. The quote would be an announcement that the two "Sis." (Y&M) are gonna behave like huns (not nuns) in the song that follows :D

    That's a possible interpretation. BTW, note that some metal bands like, say, Metallica, have songs about the Four Horsemen. And of course BM have used Apocalyptic imagery in their shows (prologues/epilogues and such). On the other hand, I've noticed no-one has commented the similarity of this song's title (Sis. Anger) to certain 'St. Anger' by, precisely, Metallica. I haven't listened to that record so I don't know, just wondering if there's some connection/tribute/wink.

    Saludos,

    Fernando :)

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    1. Thank you for interpretation. Probably those words are warning or something as you say.
      The title was probably named after that song of Metallica, but we should not think there must be some relation. It may be only because it sounds cool.

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    2. Yes, this song is very much in the style of Metallica's St. Anger album. It was an album that sounded very different than any of their others. Some key similarities are the frantic drumming style and the sections of quick, "un-pick-hand-muted" guitars. But you don't have to take my word for it, I invite you to give the Metallica album a listen. BUT! I think Babymetal did it better :)

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  13. Perhaps the problem here is that the Japanese language has levels of vugarity? Where English has only polite or vulgar. The lack of levels in English has been recognized for years by children. I remember as a child that in order to communicate degrees of politeness, we would say "please" "please please" "please please please" "pretty please" "pretty please with sugar and honey on top" each phrase increasing in politeness. Of course no adult would talk like this outside of some kind of joke or ridicule. So perhaps sis.anger cannot be accurately translated into English because vulgar English would be much too vulgar?? I cannot imagine Amuse allowing a flat out vulgar Babymetal song.

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    1. Thank you for comment.
      I think it is not a matter of language but a matter of how people feel when they say or hear these words. It may be possible to choose such English words that offend the average Englishmen as much as these Japanese words offend the average Japanese, but there is no reason to consider the average Englishmen and the average Japanese are like in such sensitivity. And I think this happens not only to abusive words but also to many other words.

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  14. Thank you. Then if I understand your comment, this song is or would be considered as offensive by the average Japanese speaker? That would really surprise me that Amuse would release an offensive Babymetal song. As far as I am aware about Amuse, nothing their talent has ever produced has been even remotely offensive.

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    1. It is a difficult question to answer.
      The average Japanese speaker would agree both the expressions themselves are somewhat offensive and the contents themselves are a sort of advice. Probably the producer persuaded the executives of Amuse to release this song by saying only those who can't understand humor would be offended or something.

      I remember a young girl tested my tolerance by saying offensive words. It was a hard test. However, for those who have already forgotten (or never had) such experiences, probably this song is a kind fantasy.

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  15. In your comnent you say the classic American word "ain't" is rude. That word is not rude but rather rube. The word is not impolite, nobody is offended by the use of the word but it is an indicator of low social class or low education as in "Only hicks use the word ain't."

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    1. Thank you for correcting. I'm looking for better explanation.
      The Japanese expressions I refer to are 'lazy' or 'rough' pronunciations rather than 'rude'. In many cases, they only show the speakers are low educated or something, but, if they are used where polite expressions are needed, they are regarded as less polite than normal pronunciation because of laziness.

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  16. Perhaps not a complete fantasy. When I was young, I had a girlfriend like this song who was always angry with me, but she never broke up with me. Finally I broke up with her because I couldn't take it anymore!

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    1. Thank you for comment.
      Yes, it's not a fantasy. I wanted to mean the reason why Amuse has released these somewhat offensive lyrics is probably they think people would (or should) take them as a fantasy.

      Delete
  17. Question:
    I wonder if they are singing this against each other instead of with each other?

    At the Wembley concert one of the intro movies told us that black-babymetal have turned to the dark side.
    Instead of being nice sweet sisters begging their parents for everything they desire, have they now turned on each other in this song?
    Instead of complimenting each others qualities now they focus on each others weaknesses (hence the title: sis. angry)?

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    1. Thank you for comment.
      Each of them will reflect on oneself when she sings this song, but I don't think they think they are this kind of weak-hearted person, so I don't think they get angry with each other in this song. I think "Sis." (= sister) suggests a strong-hearted sister gets angry her weak-hearted brother
      but she won't abandon him because they are siblings.
      Just to make sure, the title is "Sis. Anger" which is named after Metallica's "St. Anger".

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    2. Ah yes, I meant to write Sis. Anger (and almost wrote "angry" again ...).
      Thank you for the reply.

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  18. Thanks, as always, for your great work here. The verse from the Book of Revelations is the same one that Johnny Cash speaks at the beginning of "When the man comes around", another song of kind advice in harsh words.

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    1. Thank you for information.
      Johnny Cash is "shibui" (bitter & tasteful).

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  19. *Sorry if I skipped a comment along the way; I know the Bible well and wanted to dive in.*

    FWIW, the next verse in Revelation is: "And I saw, and behold a white horse: and he that sat on him had a bow; and a crown was given unto him: and he went forth conquering, and to conquer."

    There are a lot of different interpretations for that verse, whether it refers to historical events or prophesied ones or part of John's vision, but it all boils down to an ill omen of conflict and strife. Which ... hey, look what BBM did!

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  20. I don't think "sis" is short for "sister" here, I got the impression that it was the Latin word "sis" meaning "I am". The bible verse at the beginning matches this, I think, as for many centuries the bible was only in Latin and many churches today still do services entirely in latin.

    though "I am anger" is not grammatically correct in english, it could be in latin, I'm not sure. Though "I am anger" could be taken to mean "I am the personification of anger" (eg. a spirit of anger)

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    1. Thank you for suggestion, but MOAMETAL called this song "Sister Anger" in some interview.

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  21. "ill-nature" could be replaced by "attitude."

    "I'll beat your attitude into shape."
    sounds good.
    "I'll knock your attitude into shape."
    also sounds good.
    "I'll kick your butt into shape."
    Means something very similar and is a common idiom.

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    1. Thank you for suggestion.
      I'll consider it, but I'm afraid it might lose the original nuance of rebuilding a bad thing into good.

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    2. Well, "attitude" seems to be like "Konjô" in that it can be good or bad depending on context.

      "You need to loose the attitude." Means "bad attitude."
      "I like your attitude." Means "good attitude."

      I wasn't trying to SUGGEST that last one. I was just pointing out the similarities.

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  22. Is "dirty face" a face with dirt on it, or is it a facial expression?

    like a sneer, or a smirk.

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    1. It is a Japanese idiom meaning something like "I don't want to see your face" and a negative adjective is added mainly for emphasizing. Probably she felt his face was not clean because of dirt or stubble or something.

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  23. I think it would be a good to avoid negative versions of positive words(dislike, uncool).

    In English words like these are mostly used to express a less sever rejection, or they are used to sound ironic.

    If you yelled "I dislike!" people might think your being sarcastic.

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  24. 通りがかりの日本人です。英訳お疲れ様です。BABYMETALの世界を広げる素晴らしい活動ですね。

    「嫌いだ」からの「気合いだ」でアニマル浜口だなあ「闘え」繋がりなんだなあ、なんていう部分は14の解説にうまく入らないですかねー。

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    1. Thank you for comment.
      I've added his name in note #14. I think everyone can probably find "kiai" is a rhyme to "kirai".

      コメントありがとうございます。
      註14に名前を入れました。"気合" が "嫌い" と同韻語だということは、たぶん皆さん分かると思います。

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  25. I feel like Sis. Anger has close ties to St Anger from Metallica. St Anger was all about releasing your built up rage, hating someone etc, and Sis seems to be the girls doing that. It could be their ode to Metallica. I could be wrong, though, but every time I listen to Sis it always reminds me because of the really fast and strong drums, and even guitars. Does anyone else make this connection?

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    1. Thank you for comment. Probably this song has some connection with that song, but I don't know what connection it is.

      Delete
  26. So it sounds like what you are saying about the lyrics being rude but not actually using profanity is something like this. In English you can say "f*#k you" or you can say "screw you". Both have the same meaning but one is considered profanity while the other is just rude.

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    1. Thank you for comment.
      Some Japanese fans say "zakkenja nee" is very strong. I don't know exactly how much they are offended by this word, but I don't think they regard it as much offensive as some Japanese dirty words. I think they are very polite & easily offended and such words are off the scale for them.

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  27. The quotation marks may mean that is the person's reply to her. He is saying "stop kidding" because he thinks she is not being serious about being angry with him. I think this may be the case because "impossible", "useless", "it's reached the limit" are also in quotations and these are also things the person she is talking to has said.

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    1. Thank you for comment.
      As you say, "impossible", etc. are what someone has said to her. I quoted these words to clarify the sentence though they're not quoted in the original lyrics.
      However, the quotation marks around "Stop kidding! Hey you!" are just copied from the original lyrics. They don't seem to be used to mark what someone has said to her. The lyric writers of BABYMETAL sometimes use quotation marks in such a non-standard way also in other songs.

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  28. It was like they knew about Benji Webbe and the Kerrang 2016 awards before they even happened. Incredible. It's like Amuse wrote this song just for Benji. How wonderfully perfect.

    Cheers, Du Enki-san. \m/

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    1. Or before that, they may have already had some experience that made them feel like saying "stop kidding".

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  29. What about "stop screwing around" as a translation for "Zakkenja nee zoo"? It's not as vulgar as the f-word, but it's pretty rude. You couldn't say that to someone (except close friends, jokingly) without them being very offended.

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    1. Thank you for suggestion.
      Probably it'll be better, but I'm afraid that it might be taken for another meaning, and I'm not sure how much more offensive "Zakkenja nee!" (or "Stop screwing around!") is than "Fuzakeru na!" (or "Stop kidding!").
      Some Japanese dialects have stronger expressions than Tokyo dialect, and for those who know them, "Zakkenja nee!" sounds only a bit stronger than "Fuzakeru na!". This problem is too difficult for me.

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