2016/04/01

GJ!

This page is under construction. Translation may be changed.
Released on 2016 Apr. 1st, included in "METAL RESISTANCE"
Lyric: Nakata Caos, Yuyoyuppe / Music: Yuyoyuppe / Arr.: YUPPEMETAL

This song is sung by MOAMETAL & YUIMETAL.

GJ! (Good Job!) -regular ver.-

The circle mosh of the green commuter train
turns into Wall of Death with the bell and the death growl.
To the right?  To the left?  We're stray sheep.
Die! Die! Die! Die! Die! Die!

It's hard for us to climb the stairway to adulthood.
One-step!  Two-step!  Lift up!
We swim across the stormy world by crowd surfing.
Dive! Dive! Dive! Dive!  Let's go!

More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  [[Let's try hard.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
Lift us up more higher!

Good job!
We need not get irritated!  No!
Be light-hearted!  Take it easy!
Good Job!
Hazy feeling brings us nothing good!  Nothing!
We are the number one when being happy-go-lucky.

Soon after the shop opens, it's like a mosh'sh pit
with so-so roaring and Wall of Death.
Pushing!  Shoving!  It's like a crowd pushing game.
Burn! Burn! Burn! Burn! Burn! Burn!

In the breakdown, we do the hardcore mosh.
Forty percent, fifty percent, the prices are down!
We elegantly escape from pressing down and pulling off.
Get! Get! Get! Get!  Let's go!

More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  [[Let's try hard.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
Give us more extras!

More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  [[Let's try hard.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  [[Let's try hard.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  [[Let's try hard.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
Lift us up more higher!

It's transcendent! Perfect!
We give full marks even to weak-kneed persons!!  Yes!!
Don't be hasty!  Take it easy!
It's perfect!
Aiming too high brings us nothing good!  Nothing!
We are the number one when being happy-go-lucky.


GJ! -Gohôbi hen- ( Good Job! -Reward ver.- )

Every day we work hard,
so, can we have a bit of our own way today?
If someone objects to us,
bang! Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang!

Every time we are in one body.
My lovely self, thank you for hard work!
Then, shall we go vigorously?
Buy! Buy! Buy! Buy!  Let's go!

More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  [[Let's pull.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
Lift us up more higher!

Cute.
They are the rewards to ourselves!  Yes!
We turn into the buykings!  Because
they're cute.
We need not regret!  No!
Our wish list explodes and blows us up.

Every night we work hard,
so, can we treat ourselves a bit today?
If someone objects to us,
down! Down! Down! Down! Down! Down!

On everything, we do our best.
Lovely maiden, thank you for hard work!
Then, shall we go showy?
Go! Go! Go! Go!  Let's go!

More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  [[Let's pull.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
Don't lift us up.

More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  [[Let's pull.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  [[Let's pull.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!  [[Let's pull.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
Lift us up more higher!

They're transcendently delicious!
They are the rewards to ourselves!  Yes!
Our happy time can't be stopped.  Because
they're delicious.
We need not get worried!  No!
Our hearts beat fast and blow us up.



  ROMAJI LYRIC AND NOTES ARE BELOW.


[i] About the Rap Parts of Regular ver.

The first rap part depicts the crowded commuter train & the crowded station during the rush hour in Tokyo, so the second part probably depicts the crowded shop during the bargain period/time in Japan. In the rap parts, there are several words that are usually used for the things found in BABYMETAL's concerts, but they are probably used for the things found in the rush hour in Tokyo or in the bargain shops in Japan.

In some interview, Miss YUIMETAL said like she sings this song as a cheering song for fathers and mothers who go through/to such crowded places. The original lyric has only "uchira" (once) & "jibun" (twice), and other "we" & "us" are what I've inserted as supplements. Maybe she rarely goes to such crowded places, feels it's hard for her to be there, and feels respect to those who go there every day.

[ii] About the Reward Version

The Reward version is included in THE ONE limited edition. I happened to get the photo of the lyrics of that version and had a chance to listen to it.

For whom is the Reward version sung? "Jibun e no gohôbi" (= a reward to oneself; note #35) is often said by unmarried (lady) workers who can spend their money rather freely. Not a few Japanese seem to think a woman is "otome" (= maiden) as long as she has "otome-gokoro" (= maiden's mind), but I think "kawaii otome" (= lovely maiden; my dear maiden; note #30) is not used for grown-up women. I think this song is for under-age girls who spend busy days & nights (note #39).


GJ! (Good Job!) -regular ver.-

Romaji LyricEnglish TranslationNotes
 
Mi mi mi mi
midori no densha no saakuru mosshu wa The circle mosh of the green commuter train1,2
desubo no beru de WALL OF DEATH. turns into Wall of Death with the bell and the death growl.3,4
Migi?  Hidari?  Mayoeru kohitsuji. To the right?  To the left?  We're stray sheep.5
DIE! DIE! DIE! DIE! DIE! DIE! Die! Die! Die! Die! Die! Die!
 
Uchira nya kitsui ze otona no kaidan. It's hard for us to climb the stairway to adulthood.6,7,8
ONE-STEP!  TWO-STEP!  Rifuto appu! One-step!  Two-step!  Lift up!9
Seken no aranami saafu de oyoide We swim across the stormy world by crowd surfing.10,11
DIVE! DIVE! DIVE! DIVE!  LET'S GO! Dive! Dive! Dive! Dive!  Let's go!
 
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    motto motto hora.  [[Ganbatte.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    More, more, hey!  [[Let's try hard.]]
12
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
   mochiagete!
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    Lift us up more higher!
 
Joodekî! Good job!
Iraira nante ira-nai desu!  DEATH! We need not get irritated!  No!13
Kigaru ni TAKE IT EASY! Be light-hearted!  Take it easy!
Joodekî! Good job!
Moyamoya nante ii koto nai!  Nai! Hazy feeling brings us nothing good!  Nothing!14
Nootenki na jibun ga nanbaa wan. We are the number one when being happy-go-lucky.15,16
 
Kaiten mo soo soo ni mosshusshu pitto wa Soon after the shop opens, it's like a mosh'sh pit17,18
SO SO na hookoo de WALL OF DEATH. with so-so roaring and Wall of Death.
Oshiai!  Heshiai!  Oshikura-manju de Pushing!  Shoving!  It's like a crowd pushing game.19
BURN! BURN! BURN! BURN! BURN! BURN! Burn! Burn! Burn! Burn! Burn! Burn!
 
Bureiku daun wa haakoo mosshu de In the breakdown, we do the hardcore mosh.20,21
goju paa! hangaku! puraisu daun! Forty percent, fifty percent, the prices are down!22,23
Asshuku hagashi wa karei ni suruu de We elegantly escape from pressing down and pulling off.24
GET! GET! GET! GET!  LET'S GO! Get! Get! Get! Get!  Let's go!
 
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    motto motto hora.  [[Ganbatte.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    More, more, hey!  [[Let's try hard.]]
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    omake shite!
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    Give us more extras!
25
 
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    motto motto hora.  [[Ganbatte.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    More, more, hey!  [[Let's try hard.]]
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    motto motto hora.  [[Ganbatte.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    More, more, hey!  [[Let's try hard.]]
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    motto motto hora.  [[Ganbatte.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    More, more, hey!  [[Let's try hard.]]
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    mochiagete!
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    Lift us up more higher!
 
Choozetsu!  Kanpekî! It's transcendent!  Perfect!26
Henachoko datte hyaku ten desu!! DEATH!! We give full marks even to weak-kneed persons!!  Yes!!27,28
Asera-zu TAKE IT EASY! Don't be hasty! Take it easy!
Kanpekî! It's perfect!
Senobi shitatte ii koto nai!  Nai! Aiming too high brings us nothing good!  Nothing!29
Nootenki na jibun ga nanbaa wan. We are the number one when being happy-go-lucky.
 

Notes

  1. "Midori no densha" (= green train) probably refers to the commuter trains of the Yamanote line (35km loop line in the heart of Tokyo).
  2. "Circle mosh(ing)" means the crowd of audience moving circularly in some concerts. The Yamanote trains are so crowded that such a movement is impossible, so "circle" may refer to the Yamanote loop and "mosh(ing)" may refer to the over-crowded train. I've changed the translation from "in" to "of" on 2016 May 3rd.
  3. "Desubo" (= death growl) means the distorted voice of singers in some genres. Probably it refers to the announcement on the platform. The official lyric writes "合図" (= signal) and reads it as "ベル" (= bell). Probably it refers to some signal that tells the train is coming. I've changed the translation from "by" to "with" on 2016 May 3rd.
  4. "Wall of death" means the audience divided in two rushing each other in some concerts. Probably it refers to the crossing of the passengers getting off and the passengers getting on the train, but this crossing is rather orderly in Tokyo unless there are those who are not accustomed to it.
  5. "Stray sheep" is from the Christian bible. Non Christian Japanese know it as "mayoeru kohitsuji" (= stray lamb).
  6. "Uchi" originally means "inside". It also means "home" and sometimes "our" (school, company, etc). Girls & women in Kyoto/Osaka have been using "uchi" as a first personal pronoun, and now many girls nationwide use this usage probably because it sounds cute. "ra" is the particle of plurality.
  7. "Kitsui" originally means "intense" (of stimulus, etc). In this line, it emphasizes mental pain rather than physical difficulty.
  8. "Otona no kaidan" (= stairway to adulthood) means the life events in adolescence through which one grows up. Probably it refers to the stairway to the platform during the rush hour.
  9. "One-step" & "two-step" seem to mean some kinds of dance steps, but they may mean to run up the stairway to the platform by taking every step (= one-step) or skipping every other step (= two-step).
  10. "Seken no aranami" is literally "the raging waves of the society". It means the harshness of the world, but it may refer to the crowd of getting-off passengers. A student of a suburban highschool has to make her way against such a crowd because few passengers go to the same direction as her.
  11. "Saafu" is probably "crowd surfing" which means a person moving over the audience in some concerts (it is dangerous and prohibited in many concerts). Though the original lyric uses the word "oyoide" (= swim), actually the audience pass a crowd surfer over their heads to one after another. It may suggest using other people for one's own ends, but there is no such an easy way during the rush hour in Tokyo. I've changed the translation from "ride across" to "swim across" on 2016 May 3rd.
  12. The growl "ganbatte" is the conjunctive form (連用形; ren'yôkei) of "ganbaru" (= try hard). If the sentence ends with this form, "kudasai" is thought to be omitted and it is usually regarded as a kind of requesting form. In the concerts, the audience are asked to call this word. I'm not sure whether some other word is omitted and this means something like the audience will try hard (to lift up the girls) or it simply means they ask the girls to try hard.
  13. This "DEATH" is a repetition of the preceding "desu" in a playful notation, and that "desu" emphasizes the preceding "ira-nai" (= don't need), so I translate "DEATH!" to "no!".
  14. "Moya" means mist or haze. "Moyamoya" means an unclear sight or an uncomfortable mental state that one can't explain well by oneself.
  15. "Nootenki" means "thoughtless & optimistic", "carefree", or something.
  16. "Nootenki na" modifies "jibun" (= I/we). Two interpretations are possible for this: "because" or "when" "I/we am/are thoughtless & optimistic". And two interpretations are also possible for "the number one": among the people or among my/our several mental states.
  17. "Kaiten" (= shop opening) can be interpreted two ways: the beginning of a new shop or the beginning of every day's business. I think "soo soo" (= soon after) is fitter to the latter than the former.
  18. "Mosh'sh" (= mosshusshu) is pushing each other safely, enjoyably & friendly (BABYMETAL explained so before). Probably "mosh'sh pit" refers to the crowded shop. I'm not sure of the grammatical structure of these two lines. It may be "Soon after the shop opens, so-so roaring and wall of death happen in the mosh'sh pit".
  19. "Oshikura-manjû" is Japanese children's game. Basically the players just push each other. It is played usually in winter to get warm. In this line, probably the word refers to the shoppers crowding around the bargain counters.
  20. This "breakdown" is probably a musical term that means the part of a tune at which all players except few stop playing to bring some freshness. I don't know whether bargain shops have something like this except that many shops start to discount perishable foods near the closing time every day.
  21. "Haakoo mosshu" (= hardcore moshing) occurs in hardcore punk concerts, etc. It seems to be some (rather violent) type of moshing. Probably it refers to the shoppers crowding harder at a time-limited sale.
  22. I hear "goju paa hangaku" (= fifty percent, half the price), but these are written as "40%! 50%!" in the official lyric.
  23. "Haakoo mosshu de ... puraisu daun" can be interpreted two ways: the shoppers rush the shop clerks and force them to reduce the prices, or the shoppers rush the bargain counters because the prices are reduced. Probably the latter is better. I've changed the translation on 2016 May 3rd.
  24. This "asshuku" means pressing from behind near the front row of the audience in concerts. This "hagashi" means wedging in such a crowd ("hagasu" = to peel off). Probably they refer to those at bargain counters.
  25. "Omake" comes from "makeru". "Makeru" originally means to be defeated and also means to discount. The noun "omake", however, mainly means a free extra, and the verb form "omake suru/shite" means both to add an free extra and to discount. The former is better for the economy than the latter.
  26. "超絶" (chôzetsu) means being beyond the normal limits. In this line, probably it means being extraordinarily excellent or something. "Chôzetsu" may modify "kanpeki" (= extraordinarily perfect). Young people who very often use "chôzetsu" sometimes say such a phrase.
  27. "Henachoko" means a weak/petty person. It is mainly used for guys. "Henahena" means to be bent easily. I've changed the translation on 2016 May 3rd.
  28. This "DEATH" is a repetition of the preceding "desu" in a playful notation, so I translate it to "Yes". Since "desu" is the copula, it may be better to translate this line to "Even weak-kneed persons are (worth) full marks".
  29. "Senobi" originally means stretching one's back. It figuratively means "aiming too high" or "acting more adult-like" (for young people).

GJ! -Gohôbi hen- ( Good Job! -Reward ver.- )

Romaji LyricEnglish TranslationNotes
 
Eburi dei ganbatteru kara Every day we work hard,
kyoo wa chotto wagamama shite ii? so, can we have a bit of our own way today?
Nanka monku itte kuru hito wa If someone objects to us,30
BANG! BANG! BANG! BANG! BANG! BANG! bang! Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang!
 
Eburi taimu isshin dootai. Every time we are in one body.31
Kawaii jibun otsukare-sama DEATH! My lovely self, thank you for hard work!31
Sore ja doonto itchai masu ka! Then, shall we go vigorously?32,33
BUY! BUY! BUY! BUY!  LET'S GO! Buy! Buy! Buy! Buy!  Let's go!
 
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    motto motto hora.  [[Hippatte.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    More, more, hey!  [[Let's pull.]]
34
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
   mochiagete!
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    Lift us up more higher!
35
 
Kawaii. Cute.
Jibun-tachi e no gohoobi desu!  DEATH! They are the rewards to ourselves!  Yes!36,37
BUYKING ni henshin!  Datte We turn into the buykings!  Because38
kawaii. they're cute.
Kookai nante hitsuyoo nai!  Nai! We need not regret!  No!
Hoshii mono risuto ga dai-bakuhatsu. Our wish list explodes and blows us up.39
 
Eburi naito ganbatteru kara Every night we work hard,40
kyoo wa chotto zeitaku shite ii? so, can we treat ourselves a bit today?
Nanka monku itte kuru hito wa If someone objects to us,30
DOWN! DOWN! DOWN! DOWN! DOWN! DOWN! down! Down! Down! Down! Down! Down!
 
Eburishingu isshookenmei. On everything, we do our best.
Kawaii otome otsukare-sama DEATH! Lovely maiden, thank you for hard work!31
Sore ja paatto itchai masu ka! Then, shall we go showy?32, 41
GO! GO! GO! GO!  LET'S GO! Go! Go! Go! Go!  Let's go!
 
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    motto motto hora.  [[Hippatte.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    More, more, hey!  [[Let's pull.]]
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
   mochiage-nai.
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    Don't lift us up.
35,42
 
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    motto motto hora.  [[Hippatte.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    More, more, hey!  [[Let's pull.]]
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    motto motto hora.  [[Hippatte.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    More, more, hey!  [[Let's pull.]]
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
    motto motto hora.  [[Hippatte.]]
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    More, more, hey!  [[Let's pull.]]
Motto motto hora motto motto hora
   mochiagete!
More, more, hey!  More, more, hey!
    Lift us up more higher!
 
Choozetsu! ôishii. They're transcendently delicious!43
Jibun-tachi e no gohoobi desu!  DEATH! They are the rewards to ourselves!  Yes!
HAPPY taimu tomaran.  Datte Our happy time can't be stopped.  Because
ôishii. they're delicious.
Shinpai nante hitsuyoo nai!  Nai! We need not get worried!  No!
Kokoro ga tokimeite dai-bakuhatsu. Our hearts beat fast and blow us up.39
 

Notes

  1. Grammatically it is a noun clause: (we will bang/down) "those who voice some objections to us".
  2. "Kawaii jibun" means "one's lovely self" or "one's dear self". "Otome" (= maiden) refers to such oneself. It is certain here she views her everyday self from third person's viewpoint, but I'm not sure whether this phrase implies she thinks herself acting a cute girl or shows she holds herself dear or both.
  3. The form "- masu ka?" shows it is a polite interrogative, so there should be at least two persons. I'm not sure whether here are she & her friend or only both sides of her, but it seems better to regard "Jibun-tachi" as referring to her & her friend, so I think her friend also appears in this song.
  4. "Doon" (don) is an onomatopoeia used for the sound of cannon fire, a strong or heavy strike, etc. In the form of "doon to" (don to), it also represents the state of being large amount (e.g. a building being big, a person acting vigorously or big-heartedly).
  5. The growl "hippatte" (hipparu) means to pull, to stretch, etc. This is the conjunctive form (see note #12 above). To lift up the girls by pulling, the guys should stand at a higher place than them, but it seems strange to me. "Hipparu" also means to lead someone as a leader or to prolong/postpone some event. I'm not sure what it means at all.
  6. "Mochiagete" (= mochiageru) is literally "to lift (something) up". It sometimes means to praise/flatter someone. I think she probably asks someone (or herself) 'to liven her up' (= "moriageru"), but I'm not sure what specific action is referred to. I feel it a bit strange here to ask someone to praise her.
  7. "Jibun(tachi) e no gohôbi" (= the rewards to oneself/oneselves) has been used for over a decade. It seems to be an advertising slogan being a nice excuse to buy unnecessary or expensive things because rewarding is absolutely right. See also note [ii] above.
  8. This "DEATH" is a repetition of the preceding "desu" (= to be) in a playful notation, so I translate it to "yes".
  9. "Buyking" probably means the king of shoppers or the no.1 shopper, and it is a pun with Vikings. It may suggest they buy everything they want like Vikings snatched everything they want (this may be historically wrong).
  10. "Dai-bakuhatsu" is literally "big explosion". About a person, it is usually used for anger, joy, etc. and it implies such emotion makes him/her lose control of oneself. I don't think a wish list or hearts physically explode.
  11. I think "every night" suggests she is a student. Every day she goes to school, and every night she does her homework or works part-time in a hamburger shop, in a Metal band, etc. She is too young to do housework as a wife & mother at night.
  12. "Paatto" (patto) is an onomatopoeia which represents the state of scattering quickly, changes happening widely & simultaneously, being showy, etc. It suggests the way of spending money as if scattering banknotes.
  13. "Mochiage-nai" is grammatically a negative indicative form, but sometimes an indicative form is used as an imperative sentence. I'm not sure whether it is indicative or imperative.
  14. "超絶" (chôzetsu) means being beyond the normal limits. If it modifies an adjective, it means like "it is so [delicious] that I can't believe it exists in this world" or in short "extraordinarily [delicious]".
        I changed the translation from "transcendentally delicious" to "transcendently delicious" on 2016 Jun. 18th.

38 comments :

  1. When I heard the first and last intro of the song, where the drum beats for 13 times (13 x 2 = 26 times, each intro), it sounds so similar with this thing called "Tepuk Pramuka" (literally 'Scout Hand Clapping')

    This hand clapping is popularly used in Indonesia, especially by those joined Scouts in their schools. I also used to do that back when I was in Scouts during my high school. The rhythm of the hand clapping beats just exactly like the drum beat in this song.

    You can listen to this video and see if the hand clapping rhythm is sounded the same like the drum beat in GJ!
    https://youtu.be/qgCABVBk-hg
    https://youtu.be/Mde2ziJAxLM (2:40 - 2:51)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for comment.
      In Japan, it is called "三三七拍子" (san san nana-byoshi; three three seven clapping), and mainly used by "応援団" (ooendan; Japanese-style cheering team).
      Other Indonesian clappings seem rather difficult, and Indonesian girls seem to enjoy the games very much.

      Delete
  2. Looking forward to the translation of GJ "Rewards Version" :3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sorry, I haven't heard it yet.

      Delete
    2. Ah, it was on THE ONE Edition... Hopefully you can hear it soon ^^

      Delete
  3. The English booklet has the official name of the Lyricist as Nakata Caos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for correcting.
      I've fixed it.

      Delete
    2. As in Caos (C-A-O-S). No "H".

      Delete
    3. Thank you for correcting and sorry for bothering you again.

      Delete
    4. I wonder if it's Yasutaka Nakata (of Capsule/Perfume fame)...

      Delete
    5. The possibility is low because Mr. Nakata Caos is only listed as a lyric writer while Mr. Yasutaka Nakata is a composer rather than a lyric writer.

      Delete
    6. Apparently, from the metadata, "NORiMETAL", "Nakata Caos", and "NAKAMETAL" are all one Norikazu Nakayama

      Delete
    7. Thank you for comment.
      I can find no information about the relation between Norikazu Nakayama and Nakata Caos or NAKAMETAL except that these four names simply appear in a row (only in English). I'm sorry but I wonder why someone wrote like they are the same person.

      In the credits of some songs, NORiMETAL appears both as the composer and as the lyric writer, and in the credits of some other songs, NORiMETAL appears as the composer and NAKAMETAL appears as the lyric writer. That seems strange to me if they are the same person.

      I've confirmed "のりぞー" (Norizô / one of the composers of "Doki Doki Morning") said he is NORiMETAL. I've found the facebook of "中山典重" (NAKAYAMA Norikazu). Comparing Norizô's & Norikazu's profiles, they seem to be the same person.

      Delete
  4. 日本語で失礼します。
    GJ!については「もっともっとホラ」の後に続くデスヴォイスが気になっていまして、「持ち上げて」の訳語に影響を及ぼすと思うのです。
    通常版は「がんばってぇ/がんばったぁ」ですし、ご褒美編は「すいませぇん」です。
    このあたりは言語の違いによる翻訳の難しさになってしまうのでしょうが。
    代替案を提示できず、申し訳ありません。

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for suggestion.
      You say the death growls after "Motto motto hora" are: regular: "Ganbatte/ta" (= We do/did our best), reward: "Sumimasen" (= We're sorry), and these affect the translation of "Mochiagete".

      "Mochiageru" means to lift up (physical) or to flatter (figurative). It's a bit strange to say "I did my best" when asked to flatter, so this pair isn't suitable, but both are acceptable in reward ver. "Motto..." of reward ver. is not the scene that needs physical lifting up, so this isn't suitable. I try to find a better translation. I think, however, it is a bit strange, in this scene, to ask suddenly others to flatter. I think it is suitable to this scene to ask oneself to flatter oneself, though.

      提案ありがとうございます。
      持ち上げるには、物理的な意味と「おだてる」という意味が有ります。「おだてろ」と言われて「頑張りました」と言うのは少し変なので、この組合せは不適当ですが、ご褒美編では、両方可能です。ご褒美編は物理的な持上げが必要な場面ではないので、これは適当ではありません。もっと良い訳を考えます。しかし、この場面で、突然他人に「私をおだてろ」と要求するのもちょっと変だと思います。自分で自分をおだてるのなら良いですけど。

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    2. 英語が苦手なので、このまま日本語で失礼致します。
      ご褒美編の「もっともっとホラ 持ち上げて」は女性2人(多分)が(もっともっと)上司をおだてて定時に帰ってしまう、そんな風に読めるのです。
      その推測を裏付ける点があります。
      「bang! Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang!」というようなパートが双方にありますが、通常版は最後の2つの「bang! Bang!」にデスヴォイスが重なり、ご褒美編ではここにデスヴォイスはないのです。
      「Bang!」される側にいるので、発声がないのでしょう。
      以上によりご褒美編については「おだてる」意味になると考えます。

      通常版で困る点は「おまけして」の一点だけ、「おだてる」意味にとれます。
      相変わらず曖昧な歌詞なので正解はないと思うのですが、気になりました。

      歌詞カードにデスヴォイスは書いていないので困難かと存じますが、ご検討いただければ幸いです。
      無責任で申し訳ありません。

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    3. You say she (and her friend) is/are (a) worker(s) and "mochiage" means flattering her/their boss to leave work early.

      "The reward to oneself" is more suitable to workers than to students, but I feel it is a bit strange to flatter her boss here. I mean it seems to bring the mood down between getting hyper saying "let's go vigorously/showy" and actually enjoying cute/delicious things, However, it may be the case because BABYMETAL's lyrics seem to be loose on such a structure that I stick to. I will reconsider.

      「自分にご褒美」は学生より勤め人に相応しいですが、ここで上司をおだてるのは、ちょっと変だと思います。「どーんと/ぱーっと行こう」と盛り上がってから実際に可愛い/美味しいものを楽しむ間に、それではシラけそうという意味です。しかし、ベビメタの歌詞はそういう私が拘る構造がユルそうなので、そうかも知れません。再検討します。

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  5. I have some qustions:

    1. What is the story about in "Reward Edition"?
    2. What is Buy King?

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    1. Probably she is usually a model student, a honor-roll student or something. "Lovely girl in me" (literally "lovely myself") means this side. And, as the rewards to such myself, sometimes she gets out of such a model way to go shopping or to dinner. I'm not sure "we" means these both sides or her & her friend.

      Probably "Buy King" means the king of shoppers, no.1 shopper or something. It is a pun with "Viking" whom many Japanese misunderstand as a pirate.

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    2. Another one:

      Jibun-tachi e no gohoobi desu! DEATH!
      They are the rewords to ourselves! Yes!

      "Rewords" or "Rewards" ?

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    3. Nanaka monku itte kuru hito wa Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang!

      Nanaka -> Nanka

      Kororo ga tokimeite dai-bakuhatsu.
      Our hearts beat fast and blow us up.

      Kororo -> Kokoro

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    4. Thank you for correcting. I've fixed them. They are "rewards".

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  6. Thank you for translating these songs. It has helped me tremendously. I saw on YouTube Su-Metal states that the song is basically a "good job" thank you to hardworking fathers and mothers. It was very interesting.

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    1. Thank you for comment.
      I saw that video and I think Miss Yui said it. Anyway it is absolutely true because she sings the song with such thought.

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    2. I saw the video too, it's a Loudwire interview and yes it's Yui who tells that. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9RXDphrqYY min 01:15) So I guess the first part (Wall of Death in the tube) is for dads and the second part (mosh pit in the shopping centre) for mums. I find interesting the fact that it's You and Moa, i.e. Black Babymetal, who are singing these song, because they are the same who sing 'Onedari daisakusen', a song sung from the point of view of not-exactly-honest daughters. "GJ!" goes in the opposite direction. It's for cheering up parents, Yui says.

      Incidentally, yesterday I found this other video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6CzXN14y4Q (w/ Spanish subs, not perfect but OK) where the Scoopers section of Sakura Gakuin interviews the Heavy Metal Club i.e. BabyMetal, back in 2010. Two details surprised me, one, the 'Babymetal desu/death' possibly long before the song 'Babymetal Death' was written (circa 2012 I believe), and second, the Babymetal old logo, in pink, but already with the hearts and the cute skull ;)

      Saludos,

      Fernando :)

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    3. To Fernando san:
      Until "4 no Uta" was released, "Black" Babymetal was considered as the dark side of MOAMETAL & YUIMETAL like Luke Skywalker sometimes turning into Darth Vader. Such turning black by some trigger and turning normal by another trigger is often used in Japanese pop culture.

      The death=desu gimmick has been used since 1990's and BABYEMTAL has used it from the beginning. The early logo was used only for few months. Some fans said each of the skull mark, the heart mark & the thunder mark was the idea of each member of BABYMETAL.

      I think the cute skull mark is designed by Miss Yui. She designed T-shirt with the skull mark.
      http://ameblo.jp/sakuragakuin/entry-10740517409.html
      And she wore a skull mark on her left arm when she was 9 year old.
      http://ameblo.jp/sakuragakuin/entry-11881291041.html
      The photos were shot when she went to Karen Girl's final concert and she talked about her memories with Karen Girl's in the article.

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    4. Du Enki san,
      I know about these evil-turns-good in Japanese pop culture, I've watched the Dragon Ball series up to DB GT ;) Piccoro and lots of 'evil' characters becoming part of the good ones after some time (and fights). Even Vegeta turned into some kind of 'friend' of Goku's and married Bulma! :D Yes, "4 no uta" is a perfect example of that, because number 4 seems to be the Japanese number 13 (or vice versa) but Yui&Moa discovered the positive properties of the infamous number. Nicely done! I guess the 'evil' or 'dark' side to number four is the 'black' part of the song. BTW, I've noticed in the new CD credits there's no mention of BLACK BABYMETAL as such even though the songs 'GJ!' and 'Sis. Anger' are sung by our lovely duo and in some segment of the Loudwire interview Moa describes 'Sis Anger' as (musically?) 'Black metal'.

      I don't know when the pun desu=death started but it seems to be not present in the (2010-2011?) video I linked: when the three say 'Babymetal desu!', Moametal still doesn't use her tongue to emphasize the 'death' pun.

      Yes, I had read somewhere in this blog what you wrote about the origin of the tiny skull and the hearties in the logo. Yui's 2009 skull made me think of the gothic chic that's been around for some years now. I remember seeing cute gothic dolls for kids many years ago, I think it was a variation of the "Bratz" dolls, and there's been "Living Dead Dolls" from 1998 according to wikipedia. It started in the 90's I think (with movies like 'Nightmare before Christmas' and others). Cute horror craze :D

      Thanks for the infos and the links! I can't read (neither speak) Japanese at all, I'd love to understand what Yui wrote in these letters but well. I'm learning some Japanese thanks to Babymetal so that, for instance, I could ask anybody the time (ima nanji?), haha, but I wouldn't be able to understand the reply. Well, who knows, come the time, for the moment I'm learning little bits ;)

      Saludos,
      Fernando :)

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    5. To Fernando san:
      Besides such serious & long-term changes as Dragon Ball characters, there are also comical & short-term changes. For example, a sissy guy gets very aggressive only when he ride a motorcycle. I wanted to mean we need not think (too) seriously about the evil characters of "Onedari DaiSakusen" (& "Sis. Anger") because they are temporary & comically-emphasized and we all (except saints) have somewhat of them.

      It seems that someone of BABYEMTAL shows only the least credits that are needed for some business reasons.

      Miss MOAMETAL seems to have begun it around 2012 Mar.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXnMrqMqTyA
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGCp0GHxoAc

      I hope your Japanese learning goes well.

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    6. He he, don't worry, I don't take too seriously the 'evilness' of the characters in Onedari daisakusen :D I wish all the 'blackness' in 'black metal' was that way. It's better being fun than being ridiculous if you know what I mean... Ahem... (I'm saying that because the other day I was listening to Yui's favourite (?) band Cannibal Corpse and that band bored me to death... That was evil, oh yeah :D I enjoy Venom very much, though. But they are fun.)

      Thank you so much for those videos! Never seen them. In the first one, not only Moa, Suzuka is also showing tongue (not in the 'desu' moment, though). Another one like that -with combined efforts from Moa & Sumetal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N13Df3JxcEU (at the final part, in the 'moshushu' moment). Lovely! :)

      My Japanese learning is pretty aleatory nowadays. Apart from music (not only Babymetal) I've been watching Japanese movies for some years now, lots of them, by the hundreds (mainly classic movies), so I've learnt many words but I haven't the grammar basics nor anything. Some day I have to do it, I know, that's part of my tales of destinies ;)

      Saludos,
      Fernando :)







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  7. Have you had a chance to listen to the Gohoubihen? If not, here's a (no download) link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bydxzqo5EBVneDE2OHdFWC1KQ1U/view

    Also, kyoo wa chotto wagamama "site" ii –> kyoo wa chotto wagamama "shite" ii for modern Romaji?

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    1. Thank you for information & correcting.
      I always check that subreddit and I've already listened to it. Sorry for my late update.
      And I've fixed the typo. (Trivia: writing "し" as "shi" is of the Hepburn romanization which is older than kunrei romanization writing "し" as "si".)

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  8. Dear Du Enki san,

    Thank you, as always, for your hard work and all the help you give us, to understand the lyrics as well as the meaning of the songs, and the culture of Japan.

    Question: for the line "SO SO na hookoo de WALL OF DEATH," you translate as "with so-so roaring and Wall of Death." But in English, "so-so" means "mediocre" or "just okay." That seems confusing to me as an adjective for "roaring and Wall of Death."

    So I wonder whether this "so so" is related to "soo soo," in the line "Kaiten mo soo soo ni mosshusshu pitto wa" ("Soon after the shop opens, it's like a mosh'sh pit")? This might not make sense either, since as you say, "soo soo" (= soon after).

    Thank you for any help you can give in understanding this!

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    1. In the lyric card, this "So So" is written in romaji, so my first option was an English word "so-so". I thought "so-so" means "moderate" not only in good-bad but in all qualities and women crowding around bargain counters may utter something like beasts' roars but not so loud, so I translated it to "so-so roaring". If this doesn't make sense, I will look for another translation.

      "na" of "So So na" is the ending of 形容動詞 (keiyô-dôshi; lit. adjective verb) which is said to be the ending that turns a noun into an adjective (so it is also called "nominal adjective"). There is no keiyô-dôshi; "早々な" (soo soo na) in the dictionary, but, in my personal feeling, it may be acceptable when the noun somewhat relates to time: e.g. "早々な降参" (soo soo na koosan; early surrender). There is the general form "早々の咆哮" (soo soo no hookoo), and "早々な咆哮" (soo soo na hookoo; early roar) sounds strange to me, but the lyric writers may possibly have meant this.

      There are some other "soo soo na" in the dictionary, but none of them seems fit here.

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    2. This is difficult -- "so-so roaring and Wall of Death" isn't easy to put into colloquial English, since "roaring" and "Wall of Death" are very intense. So adjectives like "moderate" don't really fit well. It seems the most accurate translation might be "almost as intense as roaring or a Wall of Death." But that's awkward, and doesn't seem to fit well with the other lyrics. Maybe it makes sense to think of "so-so" as a loan-word, with its own particular Japanese meaning? -- something like "not quite as intense as"?

      Thank you again!

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    3. "So-so" is not used in Japanese as a loan-word. Please note that "so-so" modifies "roaring" only. "Sôsô" & "hôkô" were chosen for the rhyme "_ô_ô _a _ô_ô _e". Bargain shoppers hunt items like tigers, but actually both are rather quiet when hunting. The only one reason I can imagine is that the lyric writers thought it amusing to use such a difficult combination to express this state.

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    4. First off, thank you Du Enki for your translations. They add a great deal to my understanding of BABYMETAL'S songs. I am grateful.

      As to so-so, I think it makes sense in the context of this song. The word so is one of those words that has many meanings. It is true the compound so-so means slight and lesser. The use of the word so as an adjective can also mean emphasis. For example, I could say that the music was very loud and I could also say the music was so loud and both descriptions would mean the same thing.

      If I added a second so, it would only be for yet greater emphasis and to draw out the description. The music was very, very loud or the music was so, so loud. In either case, I would need a comma to separate the repeated word.

      All of this is to say that I think that what you have written is correct.

      Best Regards,

      Alex

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    5. Thank you for comment. I'm glad it makes sense.

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  9. The idiom in English for "a reward to oneself" is "Treat yourself"

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