2014/01/12

[On Radio '14 Jan. 9]

In short: About the impression of Singapore and performing there, and about their aims of this year.
This is a copy of http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AA9V13yjqQs with an English subtitle.
This is a part of the Japanese radio program "SMILE WAVE" broadcast by XFM96.3 in Singapore on 2014 Jan. 9th. The transcription (.srt file) is below.


Notes

  1. "BABYMETAL" is pronounced not "beibimetl" but "bebimetl". The MC is wrong.
  2. Nippon Budokan is a hall for martial arts in Tokyo (build for judo of Tokyo Olympic 1964). Since the Beatles performed here in 1966, it has also become famous as concert venue having capacity of about 10,000.
  3. In this interview BABYMETAL use many "kudasaru" (a polite form of "kureru"), and I translate them to "kindly". When used alone, it means "to give me/us", but when attached other verb, it shows the perceiving of other's favor and the gratitude to it (such as "for me/us"). A Japanese sentence lacking this sounds like "... but I don't care what you do."
  4. If you make and sell some BABYMETAL goods without the permission of Amuse Inc., it may sue you for violation of copyright, publicity right, or else.
  5. (Hainanese) chicken rice is a Chinese-origin dish popular in some Southeast Asia countries. There is another "chicken rice" in Japan.
  6. BABYMETAL has performed in Singapore 3 times: 2012 Nov. (AFA), 2013 Nov. (AFA), 2013 Dec.
  7. Of 30 performances that BABYMETAL did in 2013, 3 in Osaka, 1 in Hokkaido, 1 in Shiga, 1 in Jakarta, 2 in Singapore, and the rest are done in Tokyo metropolitan area.

[i] BABYMETAL's Kakizome

"書き初め" (kakizome) is new-year's first writing with writing brush. Recently some write their hopes or aims as kakizome. On Jan. 7th I found this photo by chance. It seems to have been captured from the movie in BABYMETAL APOCALYPSE WEB, but the movie seems to have been deleted soon.

Miss YUIMETAL: "Kookai shinai, zettai." = I won't regret. Never.

Miss SU-METAL: "Jibun o shinjiru." = I believe in myself.

Miss MOAMETAL: "Ichion nyuukon" = Putting whole my soul into every one note.

This is an adaptation of "一球入魂" (ikkyuu nyuukon), the word of a Japanese baseball coach in the past who associated baseball with education and budo (= Japanese martial arts). By this word he meant something like "You should do your best every time as if it was the last pitch/swing in your life."



  The transcription (.srt file) is below.